Yes, Black People DO Picnic.

collage of African and Caribbean finger foods and various photos of a Black girl lying on a picnic blanket.

Type the word “picnic” into a search engine or stock photo website; what do you see? Look at the ads for sparkling wines or picnic baskets on social media. Notice anything brown?

There’s a misconception that Black people don’t organize, attend and have a grand old time at picnics. That we don’t lay out a blanket on the crash and snack and chat for hours under the sun with friends. That we only barbecue at our cousins house in the heat of the summer. 

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Well, we do go on picnics and we do so joyfully, with aluminium foil- clad baskets filled with waakye, pholourie, fritay, mandazi, stamp and go, cornbread, and suya.

Some of us take their time crossing the park with small coolers packed with ice and containers of pikliz, cheese paste sandwiches, potato salad, coleslaw and bunches of guinep sitting on top of the watermelon. And still, others pull up the rear with small carts of mauby, zobo, kola champagne, and Ti’ Punch for the grown folks. 

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It’s time for our finger foods and full, picnic-friendly meals to be featured. For the food writers reading this to recognize all of these terms and to support the Black content creators writing about these culinary delights by bringing them to the front pages of their print spreads and digital issues.

For food chains to feature us in their summer season commercials, and for the Black-owned businesses who make these specialties to sell out night after night because food enthusiasts know bofrot and festival like they know beignets and fries. 

Whether you’re inside or outside of the diaspora, we invite you to peruse the recipes, read the reflections, and order from the restaurants participating in this edition of BLACK FOODIE Picnic Day right here, online and through our social media channels.

Each month’s execution might be a little different, but the purpose of the campaign will remain the same: to push Black people’s picnic experiences into the spotlight and revel in the joy of eating outside.

So grab your picnic blanket, lawn chairs, or comfy cushions and come on, cousin! Let’s eat!

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